Embracing Compassion and Collaboration in Managing National Security Threats

 
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
THURSDAY, MAY 18, 2017
Contact: Ilene Greenfield
Director of Media Relations
973-278-5400, ext. 1-5122
igl@BerkeleyCollege.edu
 

 EMBRACING COMPASSION AND COLLABORATION
IN MANAGING NATIONAL SECURITY THREATS

Law Enforcement and Healthcare Professionals Share Experiences
at Berkeley College 4th Annual National Security Forum,
“Events that Changed Our Way of Life Forever”

 

Photo Caption A: Anthony Moscato, Assistant U.S. Attorney, Chief, National Security Unit, U.S. Department of Justice, District of New Jersey, discusses progress made in decreasing national security threats the audience during 4th Annual National Security Forum, “Events that Changed Our Way of Life Forever,” on May 17, 2017, at Berkeley College in Woodland Park, NJ.

Law enforcement and healthcare professionals emphasized the importance of compassion and collaboration when maintaining public safety amidst national security threats during the 4th Annual National Security Forum, “Events that Changed Our Way of Life Forever,” held Wednesday at Berkeley College in Woodland Park, NJ.

Active and retired professionals from the Federal Bureau of Investigation, U.S. Attorney’s Office, U.S. Army, and the New York City Police Department, among other public and private entities, shared firsthand accounts and case studies of the after-effects from terror attacks on American soil, as well as the progress being made in national security.

“In this forum we are able to sit together, listen, learn about the experiences of others and apply that to our lives, personally and professionally,” said Michael J. Smith, President of Berkeley College, while addressing an audience of law enforcement and healthcare professionals, as well as students from the Berkeley College School of Professional Studies and School of Health Studies.

 

Oklahoma City Bombing: Kathy Sanders’ Journey to Forgiveness

Kathy Sanders, author of Now You See Me: How I Forgave the Unforgivable, delivered the keynote address at the forum. Ms. Sanders became the face for media’s coverage of the Oklahoma City bombing on April 19, 1995, after her two young grandsons were killed in the explosion.

Ms. Sanders relived her experience at the scene of the massacre, and how she discovered that her grandsons Chase, age 2, and Colton, age 3, were among the lives lost during the attack on the Alfred P. Murrah building in Oklahoma City. She discussed her quest to seek answers for how such an incident could occur, which led to conducting her own investigation and forming an unlikely bond with one of the bombers, Terry Nichols, and his family.

The more time Ms. Sanders spent with the Nichols family, the more she realized she needed to forgive in order to heal. “Forgiveness and punishment are two different things,” she said. “The unwillingness to forgive is at the heart of every conflict. We need to incorporate forgiveness into every aspect of our lives.”

Photo Caption B: Kathy Sanders shares her story of grief and healing after her two young grandsons were killed in the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing during the 4th Annual National Security Forum, “Events that Changed Our Way of Life Forever,” on May 17, 2017, at Berkeley College in Woodland Park, NJ.

 

Our Nation’s Heroes: Stories of Those Who Responded

Empathy, compassion, collaboration and flexibility were topics discussed during the first of two panels, featuring panelists who experienced the immediate aftermath of national security threats first hand as first responders.

Daniel Coss, CPP, Director of Security and Public Safety, Valley Health System, and Professor, Justice Studies, Berkeley College School of Professional Studies, recalled arriving to the scene of the Oklahoma City bombing as a police officer and victim, trying to assist his mother, Ms. Sanders, in locating her young grandsons and his nephews.

“Police officers recognize death and get used to it in some fashion … but the families do not understand the process of death,” Dr. Cross said. “We should never forget what we do (as first responders) affects the victims. You can protect – do it with compassion, empathy and common sense.”

“You think you are prepared, but you are never going to have every situation carved out,” said Josiane Hickson, EdD, RN-BC, NE-BC, Chair, Practical Nurse and Patient Care Technician programs, Berkeley College School of Health Studies.

Dr. Hickson and John Grant, JD, Professor, Justice Studies, Berkeley College School of Professional Studies, and G3 Training Officer, New York National Guard, recalled their own experiences while responding to the September 11, 2001, attacks in Manhattan, NY. Dr. Hickson was a nurse who assisted in treating victims during the attacks, while Lieutenant-Colonel Grant was deployed by the New York National Guard to the World Trade Center.

“The streets were littered all around ankle deep, with broken pieces of furniture, dust, and body parts,” Lieutenant-Colonel Grant said. “Civilians were gone and responders were there. All of us did the same thing. We responded the way we were trained and expected to.”

 

Photo Caption C: Daniel Coss, CPP, Director of Security and Public Safety, Valley Health System, and Professor, Justice Studies, Berkeley College School of Professional Studies, discusses the need for empathy and collaboration during the 4th Annual National Security Forum, “Events that Changed Our Way of Life Forever,” held on May 17, 2017, at Berkeley College in Woodland Park, NJ.

 

Addressing the Country’s Threats and Concerns to National Security: Are We Doing Enough and What Can We Improve?

During the second panel, Anthony Moscato, Assistant U.S. Attorney, Chief, National Security Unit, U.S. Department of Justice, District of New Jersey, gave an in-depth look at the types of international terror threats facing New Jersey and beyond, including homegrown violent extremists.

“Homegrown violent extremists are directed or inspired; they are a big culprit, as their whereabouts are unknown,” said Anthony Moscato, Assistant U.S. Attorney, Chief, National Security Unit, U.S. Department of Justice, District of New Jersey “We have to work every day to overcome these threats.”

“When we know of an attack, it is the intelligence we have before and after that will help; it is just a matter of when and where it will take place,” Detective Dennis Jones (Ret.), New York City Police Department, Director of Safety, HELP USA, and Executive Director, Metro New York Concerns Police Survivor Chapter. “Any situation can be turned into a terrorist situation.”

The panel of professionals acknowledged that the key to decreasing threats on American soil is maintaining communication with the community, emphasizing the importance of the motto “See Something, Say Something.”

“It is very hard to help someone if they don’t have trust in you, and that is one of the biggest hurdles we (regularly) have to overcome,” said Keyla Munoz, Victim Witness Coordinator, Federal Bureau of Investigation, Newark Field Office, in regards to her department’s efforts in providing assistance to victims of events ranging from acts of terrorism to bank robberies.

“I cannot tell you how many times we were able to launch a case just because someone had the trust and faith to come forward,” said Special Agent Theresa Fanelli (Ret.), Federal Bureau of Investigation, and Professor, Justice Studies, Berkeley College School of Professional Studies. “Many people do not know how important that piece of information could be to a larger investigation.”

 

 

Photo Caption D: (L to R) Anthony Moscato, Assistant U.S. Attorney, Chief, National Security Unit, U.S. Department of Justice, District of New Jersey; Gary Krulish, Co-Chair, Justice Studies, Berkeley College School of Professional Studies; Detective Dennis Jones (Ret.), New York City Police Department, Director of Safety, HELP USA, and Executive Director, Metro New York Concerns Police Survivor Chapter; Special Agent Theresa Fanelli (Ret.), Federal Bureau of Investigation, and Professor, Justice Studies, Berkeley College School of Professional Studies; and Keyla Munoz, Victim Witness Coordinator, Federal Bureau of Investigation, Newark Field Office, share their experiences during the panel, “Addressing the Country’s Threats and Concerns to National Security: Are We Doing Enough and What Can We Improve?,” at the 4th Annual National Security Forum, “Events that Changed Our Way of Life Forever,” held on May 17, 2017, at Berkeley College in Woodland Park, NJ.

 

Photo Caption E: John Grant, JD, Professor, Justice Studies, Berkeley College School of Professional Studies, and G3 Training Officer, New York National Guard (second from left); Josiane Hickson, EdD, RN-BC, NE-BC, Chair, Practical Nurse and Patient Care Technician programs, Berkeley College School of Health Studies (third from left); Dr. Daniel Coss, CPP, Director of Security and Public Safety, Valley Health System, and Professor, Justice Studies, Berkeley College School of Professional Studies (third from right); and Eva Skuka, MD, PhD, Dean, Berkeley College School of Health Studies (far right), share their experiences during the panel, “Our Nation’s Heroes: Stories of Those Who Responded,” at the 4th Annual National Security Forum, “Events that Changed Our Way of Life Forever,” held on May 17, 2017, at Berkeley College in Woodland Park, NJ. Also appearing above are Charlane Brown-Wyands, JD, Co-Chair, Department of Justice Studies, Berkeley College School of Professional Studies, New York City Police Department (Ret., far left); and : Kathy Sanders, author of Now You See Me: How I Forgave the Unforgivable (second from right).

 

About Berkeley College

A leader in providing career-focused education since 1931, Berkeley College is accredited by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education and enrolls more than 8,000 students – including more than 550 international students – in its Master’s, Bachelor’s and Associate’s degree and Certificate programs. Students can study in more than 20 career fields. Berkeley College is comprised of the Larry L. Luing School of Business®, the School of Professional Studies, the School of Health Studies, and the School of Liberal Arts. The School of Graduate Studies offers an MBA in Management online and in Woodland Park, NJ.

Berkeley College has five New Jersey campuses – Dover, Newark, Paramus, Woodbridge and Woodland Park. In New York there are three campuses – Midtown Manhattan, Brooklyn and White Plains. Berkeley College Online® serves a global population. For four consecutive years, U.S. News & World Report has named Berkeley College among the Best Colleges for Online Bachelor’s Programs and among the Best Online Bachelor’s Programs for Veterans. The website address iswww.BerkeleyCollege.edu.

- End -

To view high resolution versions of the above photos, go to:

Photo A.

Photo B.

Photo C.

Photo D.

Photo E.

 

Recent Releases

Aug 17, 2017 5:52:00 AM

“Women in Media: The Courage to Own Your Story” - Berkeley College to Host Panels of Leaders in Media during Women’s Entrepreneurship Week

In honor of Women’s Entrepreneurship Week, Berkeley College is hosting special events in New York and New Jersey featuring ...
Aug 17, 2017 12:00:00 AM

Council for Interior Design Accredits Berkeley College Bachelor of Fine Arts Program

Berkeley College has received specialized accreditation for its Bachelor of Fine Arts in Interior Design program from the ...
Aug 15, 2017 8:53:00 AM

First Class of MBA Graduates Ready to Move Up in the Business World

Berkeley College reaches a milestone this month, as its inaugural class of MBA in Management students complete their studies.